WGSS Speaker Series

Gender and Political Economy in Africa 

The Fall 2015 WGSS Speaker Series is organized by the Program of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Yale with support from the Edward J. and Dorothy Kempf Memorial Fund.

October 28, 4pm @ WLH 309 - Gretchen Bauer, University of Delaware
‘A lot of head wraps’: Recent Developments in Women’s Political Leadership in Sub-Saharan Africa
Gretchen Bauer is professor of political science and international relations and faculty director of the UD Africa Initiative at the University of Delaware. Her current research focuses on women’s political leadership in sub-Saharan Africa. She is the co-editor with Hannah Britton of Women in African Parliaments (2006), with Manon Tremblay of Women in Executive Power: A Global Overview (2011) and with Josephine Dawuni of Gender and the Judiciary in Africa: From Obscurity to Parity? (2016). In spring 2016 she will be a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ghana Legon, based at the Legon Center for International Affairs and Diplomacy (LECIAD) and the Center for Gender Studies and Advocacy (CEGENSA).

December 9, 4:30pm @WLH 309 - Shireen Hassim, University of Witwatersrand
In South Africa, For Instance: Thinking About Equality and Institutions from the South
Shireen Hassim is a Professor of Politics and her research interests are in the area of feminist theory and politics, social movements and collective action, the politics of representation and affirmative action, and social policy. Her most recent book is The ANC Women’s League: Sex, Gender, Politics, Jacana/ Ohio Press 2015. She is co-editor of No Shortcuts to Power: Women and Policymaking in Africa (2003); Gender and Social Policy in a Global Context (2006) and Go Home or Die Here: Xenophobia, Violence and the Reinvention of Difference in South Africa. She is the author of Women’s Organizations and Democracy in South Africa: Contesting Authority (2006), which won the 2007 American Political Science Association’s Victoria Shuck Award for best book on women and politics.

April 6, 4:30pm @Luce Hall, Rm 202 - Anne Pticher, Univ of Michigan and Abosede George, Barnard College & Columbia Univ
A Panel on Women in Urban Africa: Perspectives from 20th Century Lagos and 21st Century Luanda

Anne Pitcher, University of Michigan
Are Women Satisfied? Gender and Urban Housing Provision in Luanda, Angola
Anne Pitcher is a Professor of African Studies and Political Science at the University of Michigan. She is also Vice-President of the African Studies Association. Her research focuses on the political economy of urban residential development in Angola, South Africa, and Kenya.  Her previous books include Politics in the Portuguese Empire (Oxford University Press, 1993) and Transforming Mozambique: The Politics of Privatization, 1975-2000 (Cambridge University Press, 2002) as well as many articles.  Her latest book, Party Politics and Economic Reform in Africa’s Democracies (Cambridge, 2012) won Honorable Mention for best book award from the African Politics Conference Group, an organized section of the American Political Science Association and a related group of the African Studies Association.

Abosede George is Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies at Barnard College and Columbia University since 2007. She received her PhD in History in 2006 from Stanford University.  Her research and teaching interests have been focused on urban history of Africa, the history of childhood and youth in Africa, and the study of women, gender, and sexuality in African History. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Social History, Women’s Studies Quarterly, and the Scholar and Feminist Online.  Her new book, Making Modern Girls: A History of Girlhood, Labor, and Social Development was published in 2014 by Ohio University Press in their New African Histories series. Increasingly her research interests have turned to the 19th century in Lagos, to issues of gender, ethnicity, migration, and the records of reverse diaspora communities from the Americas, the Caribbean, and other regions of West Africa. She is currently at work on The Ekopolitan Project, a digital archive of family history sources on migrant communities in nineteenth- and twentieth century Lagos, West Africa. Visit: www.ekopolitanproject.org She maintains faculty affiliations with the Africana Studies Program at Barnard, the Institute for African Studies at Columbia (IAS), the Barnard Center for Research on Women (BCRW), and the Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference (CCASD). She received her B.A. from Rutgers University (1999) and her Ph.D. from Stanford (2006).

April 20, 4:30pm @Luce Hall, Rm 203 - Mary Kay Gagerty, University of Washington
Self-Help Groups and Women’s Participation in Agricultural Markets in Tanzania
Mary Kay Gugerty is the Nancy Bell Evans Professor of Nonprofit Management at the Evans
School of Public Policy and Governance. Her scholarship examines how individuals and
organizations engage in collective action and build institutions of collaborative governance.  Current work examines how women’s participation in self-help groups affects participation in agricultural value chains in Tanzania.  Her research also examines evaluation and impact measurement in the social sector; she is co-editor of Voluntary Regulation of Nonprofit and Nongovernmental Organizations: An Accountability Club Framework and Advocacy Organizations: A Collective Action Perspective. Her forthcoming book, The Goldilocks Challenge: Right-Size Data for Nonprofits and NGOs is co-authored with Dean Karlan.